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Ontario: Property Crime Violations Rate per 100,000

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Geography:Ontario
Account:Community Safety and Social Vitality
Information:Property Crime Violations Rate per 100,000
Selected Data Type: Rate per 100,000 population based on Actual Incidents
Data Source:Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Special Tabulations, 2006 to 2015.
Copyright:Newfoundland & Labrador Statistics Agency, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Non-violent offences are counted in terms of the number of incidents.  For non-violent offences (property, drug etc.), the basic counting rule is that one offence is counted for each distinct or seperate incident.  The number of non-violent offences equals the number of non-violent incidents.  The exception to this rule occurs when there is a theft of multiple vehicles from the same place at the same time, each vehicle would be counted as a seperate offence.  However, the theft of four vehicles at the same time from a new or used car lot would involve one offence only.

Data on incidents that come to the attention of police are captured and forwarded to the CCJS according to a nationally approved set of common scoring rules and definitions.  The reader should note however, that many factors could influence official crime statistics.  These include:  reporting by the public to the police; reporting by police to the CCJS; and the impact of new intiative such as changes in legislation, policies or enforcement polices.

Year-over-year comparisons should be made with caution as many non-criminally related factors can affect data from one year to another (openings, closures or reorganizations of police departments, redistribution of municipalities serviced among different police departments, significant population increases etc.).

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey produces a continuous historical record of crime and traffic statistics reported by every police agency in Canada since 1962.  In 1988, a new version of the survey was created, UCR2, and is since referred to as the "incident-based" survey, in which microdata on characteristics of incidents, victims and accused are captured.  For more information please click here.

Statistics Canada information is used with the permission of Statistics Canada.  Users are forbidden to copy the data and redisseminate them, in an original or modified form, for commercial purposes, without the expressed permission of Statistics Canada.  Information on the availability of the wide range of data from Statistics Canada can be obtained from Statistics Canada's Regional Offices, it's Web site at http://www.statcan.gc.ca/  and it's toll-free access number 1-800-263-1136.

Part of the 2007 increase in crime in St. Johns, NL and Saint John, NB can be attributed to changes in police reporting practices rather than actual increases in criminal activity. This would affect the provincial totals in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The "adult" age group includes those age 18 and over, and the "youth" age group includes offenders under 18. Although the youth crime rates are calculated using the age 12-17 population, there may be a small number of offenders under 12 years of age included in the data.

a Prior to 2010, the fraud category includes identity theft and identity fraud, but in recent years these have been separated into their own categories. Therefore use caution when comparing 2010 onward to previous years.

b Identity fraud and identity theft are new violation codes which were introduced in January 2010. Some police services revised historical data, and as a result may have affected some of the 2009 data; therefore these data should be interpreted with caution.

Theft of a Motor Vehicle
Theft of a motor vehicle is taken without the owner's consent. When a number of motor vehicles are stolen at the same time and place, one offence is counted for each vehicle.

Established Categories:

(a) Automobiles - include all models of automobiles and station wagons.
(b) Trucks - includes all models of trucks and buses designed to transport people or freight, including sport-utility vehicles, vans, mini-vans and motor homes.
(c) Motorcycle - includes all types of motorcycles with two or three wheels such as motorized bicycles, motor scooters.
(d) Other Motor Vehicles - motorized snow vehicles, farm tractors and other self-propelled farming implements.  Cranes, fork-lifts, graders, bulldozers and other self-propelled vehicles designed and used on construction sites, building and maintenance of roads and in lumber industry, army tanks, army jeeps and all-terrain vehicles.

The following are not considered as motor vehicles:  boats, vessels of all types, aircrafts, hovercrafts, golf-carts, power wheelchairs, lawn and garden tractors and non-comemrcial type snowblowers.
Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada
The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCSJ), in cooperation with the policing community, collects police reported crime statistics through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR). The UCR was developed to measure the incidence of crime in Canadian society and its characteristics. It can represent both the survey instrument itself or the aggregate form of the UCR data.
Youth
Refer to those aged 12-17 (inclusive).

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  • Change Data Type
    Rate per 100,000 population based on Actual Incidents
    Rate per 100,000 Population Age 12-17 Based on Total Youth Charged
    Rate per 100,000 Population Age 12 and over Based on Total Persons Charged
    Rate per 100,000 Population Age 18 and over Based on Total Adults Charged

   
  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Total Property Crime Violations3,665.91 3,429.02 3,258.12 3,193.27 2,967.50 2,759.56 2,644.00 2,358.04 2,271.14 2,283.31
Total Breaking And Entering547.67 489.98 451.21 437.12 417.42 381.79 365.00 310.49 291.22 288.11
Possess Stolen Property114.10 108.30 101.86 102.67 100.44 68.35 41.16 32.15 26.38 26.80
Total Theft of Motor Vehicle303.22 270.00 238.76 209.48 172.43 156.56 142.23 119.97 116.64 122.18
Total Theft Over $5,00043.67 42.33 39.70 36.82 35.10 35.02 34.11 30.54 30.09 32.32
Theft Over $5,000 (non motor vehicle)32.63 32.15 31.05 27.91 27.02 27.29 27.05 23.81 22.99 24.39
Theft Over $5,000 From a Motor Vehicle10.58 9.59 7.99 7.98 7.14 6.66 6.29 5.92 6.16 6.78
Shoplifting Over $5,0000.45 0.59 0.67 0.93 0.94 1.08 0.77 0.81 0.95 1.15
Total Theft Under $5,0001,544.30 1,474.11 1,429.13 1,450.84 1,373.41 1,318.72 1,287.22 1,179.34 1,141.08 1,113.37
Theft $5,000 or Under (non motor vehicle)805.28 771.63 715.39 651.73 622.11 610.76 600.42 562.69 511.62 496.27
Theft $5,000 or Under From a Motor Vehicle529.85 500.14 515.08 573.47 514.90 469.33 436.78 372.01 359.32 339.10
Shoplifting $5,000 or Under209.17 202.34 198.66 225.64 236.39 238.62 250.02 244.65 270.14 278.00
Frauda287.09 268.05 280.97 269.79 251.43 236.79 231.35 223.51 221.78 257.10
Identity Theftb.. .. .. .. 1.87 3.74 3.66 3.01 2.39 3.32
Identity Fraudb.. .. .. .. 7.77 14.76 18.28 18.29 25.87 25.91
Total Mischief802.28 753.05 696.24 664.65 589.71 528.52 503.93 427.54 403.31 402.24
Arson23.58 23.21 20.24 21.90 17.91 14.97 16.38 12.19 11.46 10.93

Notes:

Non-violent offences are counted in terms of the number of incidents.  For non-violent offences (property, drug etc.), the basic counting rule is that one offence is counted for each distinct or seperate incident.  The number of non-violent offences equals the number of non-violent incidents.  The exception to this rule occurs when there is a theft of multiple vehicles from the same place at the same time, each vehicle would be counted as a seperate offence.  However, the theft of four vehicles at the same time from a new or used car lot would involve one offence only.

Data on incidents that come to the attention of police are captured and forwarded to the CCJS according to a nationally approved set of common scoring rules and definitions.  The reader should note however, that many factors could influence official crime statistics.  These include:  reporting by the public to the police; reporting by police to the CCJS; and the impact of new intiative such as changes in legislation, policies or enforcement polices.

Year-over-year comparisons should be made with caution as many non-criminally related factors can affect data from one year to another (openings, closures or reorganizations of police departments, redistribution of municipalities serviced among different police departments, significant population increases etc.).

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey produces a continuous historical record of crime and traffic statistics reported by every police agency in Canada since 1962.  In 1988, a new version of the survey was created, UCR2, and is since referred to as the "incident-based" survey, in which microdata on characteristics of incidents, victims and accused are captured.  For more information please click here.

Statistics Canada information is used with the permission of Statistics Canada.  Users are forbidden to copy the data and redisseminate them, in an original or modified form, for commercial purposes, without the expressed permission of Statistics Canada.  Information on the availability of the wide range of data from Statistics Canada can be obtained from Statistics Canada's Regional Offices, it's Web site at http://www.statcan.gc.ca/  and it's toll-free access number 1-800-263-1136.

Part of the 2007 increase in crime in St. Johns, NL and Saint John, NB can be attributed to changes in police reporting practices rather than actual increases in criminal activity. This would affect the provincial totals in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The "adult" age group includes those age 18 and over, and the "youth" age group includes offenders under 18. Although the youth crime rates are calculated using the age 12-17 population, there may be a small number of offenders under 12 years of age included in the data.

a Prior to 2010, the fraud category includes identity theft and identity fraud, but in recent years these have been separated into their own categories. Therefore use caution when comparing 2010 onward to previous years.

b Identity fraud and identity theft are new violation codes which were introduced in January 2010. Some police services revised historical data, and as a result may have affected some of the 2009 data; therefore these data should be interpreted with caution.

Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Special Tabulations, 2006 to 2015.

Copyright: Newfoundland & Labrador Statistics Agency
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Data last updated on August 17, 2017

An initiative of Northern Policy Institute
Developed by the Newfoundland and Labrador Statistics Agency
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