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Ontario: Other Criminal Code Violations

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Geography:Ontario
Account:Community Safety and Social Vitality
Information:Other Criminal Code Violations
Selected Data Type: Actual incidents
Years: 2010 to 2015
Data Source:Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Special Tabulations, 2006 to 2015.
Copyright:Newfoundland & Labrador Statistics Agency, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Data on incidents that come to the attention of police are captured and forwarded to the CCJS according to a nationally approved set of common scoring rules and definitions.  The reader should note however, that many factors could influence official crime statistics.  These include:  reporting by the public to the police; reporting by police to the CCJS; and the impact of new intiatives such as changes in legislation, policies or enforcement polices.

Year-over-year comparisons should be made with caution as many non-criminally related factors can affect data from one year to another (openings, closures or reorganizations of police departments, redistribution of municipalities serviced among different police departments, significant population increases etc.).

Part of the 2007 increase in crime in St. Johns, NL and Saint John, NB can be attributed to changes in police reporting practices rather than actual increases in criminal activity. This would affect the provincial totals in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The "adult" age group includes those age 18 and over, and the "youth" age group includes offenders under 18. Although almost all youth offenders are aged 12-17, there may be a small number of offenders under 12 years of age included in the data.

Figures may not add to total due to random rounding.

a Data is displayed for selected categories under this heading. Therefore the categories may not add to the total.

b Any increase in disturbing the peace violations may be, in part, attributable to a national data quality initiative undertaken by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to properly account for the types of offences that are aggregated under this offence.

Incident
The basis for counting reported crime in the UCR Survey. An incident is a set of connected events that usually make up a reported occurrence. The reported incident is used in conjunction with Most Serious Offence (MSO).
Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada
The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCSJ), in cooperation with the policing community, collects police reported crime statistics through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR). The UCR was developed to measure the incidence of crime in Canadian society and its characteristics. It can represent both the survey instrument itself or the aggregate form of the UCR data.
Most Serious Offence (MSO)
Classifies an incident according to the most serious offence committed during the incident. In categorizing incidents, violent offences always take precedence over non-violent offences. Offences are then sorted according to maximum sentence under the Criminal Code of Canada.
Other Criminal Code incidents
Involve other criminal code incidents that are not classified as either violent, property or traffic.
Actual Incidents
When a crime is reported to the police, the incident is recorded as a “reported” incident. Police then conduct a preliminary investigation to determine the validity. Occasionally crimes reported to the police prove to be unfounded. Unfounded incidents are subtracted from the number of incidents to produce the number of “actual incidents.”
Cleared by Charge
When a police investigation leads to the identification of a suspect, an “information” is laid against that person (i.e., the person is charged).
Cleared Otherwise
In some cases police cannot lay an information even if they have identified a suspect and have enough to support the laying of an information. Examples include diplomatic immunity, instances when then the complainant declines to proceed with charges, or cases when the accused dies.
Persons Charged
Includes the number of people charged (not the number of charges laid) or recommended for charges by the police. A person who is simultaneously charged with more than one offence is counted according to the most serious incident, even if the offences occurred in more than one incident. In addition, persons may be counted more than once throughout the year; that is, individuals are counted on each occasion they are charged by the police. Note: In some cases a criminal incident may be solved months or even years after it was reported to the police. For this reason it is possible for the number of cases cleared to be different than the total reported actual incidents (Statistics Canada, 2004)
Youth
Refer to those aged 12-17 (inclusive).

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    Actual incidents
    Total, adult charged
    Total, persons charged
    Total, youth charged
    Total cleared

 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Total Other Criminal Code Violations71,050 67,780 67,000 65,625 65,160 65,925
Counterfeiting205 170 120 205 195 235
Total weapons violationsa4,295 3,930 3,955 3,750 3,740 3,870
Possession of weapons3,600 3,230 3,160 3,110 3,150 3,265
Firearms documentation or administration210 190 250 165 175 190
Child pornography570 900 1,120 1,285 1,200 1,290
Total prostitution975 575 510 495 270 55
Disturb the peaceb7,480 6,890 6,670 7,485 6,515 6,010
Total administration of justice violations49,755 47,880 46,960 45,420 46,520 47,825
Fail to comply with order26,165 25,525 24,515 23,560 23,195 24,100
Prisoner unlawfully at large1,290 1,465 1,510 1,290 1,240 1,160
Fail to appear8,895 7,705 7,610 7,860 9,815 9,750
Breach of probation11,180 10,935 11,235 10,705 10,450 10,950
Escape or helps to escape from lawful custody295 280 220 165 160 175
Other violations against the administration of law and justice1,935 1,970 1,870 1,835 1,660 1,685
Total other violations7,765 7,435 7,655 6,990 6,720 6,630
Indecent acts1,465 1,465 1,520 1,415 1,460 1,465
Obstruct public or peace officer1,945 1,785 1,675 1,560 1,465 1,460
Trespass at night800 775 880 715 690 735
Utter threats to property or animal430 380 410 420 410 415
Firearms and other offensive weapons255 210 240 190 205 165
Proceeds of crime125 165 140 135 165 140

Notes:

Data on incidents that come to the attention of police are captured and forwarded to the CCJS according to a nationally approved set of common scoring rules and definitions.  The reader should note however, that many factors could influence official crime statistics.  These include:  reporting by the public to the police; reporting by police to the CCJS; and the impact of new intiatives such as changes in legislation, policies or enforcement polices.

Year-over-year comparisons should be made with caution as many non-criminally related factors can affect data from one year to another (openings, closures or reorganizations of police departments, redistribution of municipalities serviced among different police departments, significant population increases etc.).

Part of the 2007 increase in crime in St. Johns, NL and Saint John, NB can be attributed to changes in police reporting practices rather than actual increases in criminal activity. This would affect the provincial totals in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The "adult" age group includes those age 18 and over, and the "youth" age group includes offenders under 18. Although almost all youth offenders are aged 12-17, there may be a small number of offenders under 12 years of age included in the data.

Figures may not add to total due to random rounding.

a Data is displayed for selected categories under this heading. Therefore the categories may not add to the total.

b Any increase in disturbing the peace violations may be, in part, attributable to a national data quality initiative undertaken by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to properly account for the types of offences that are aggregated under this offence.

Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Special Tabulations, 2006 to 2015.

Copyright: Newfoundland & Labrador Statistics Agency
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Data last updated on August 16, 2017

An initiative of Northern Policy Institute
Developed by the Newfoundland and Labrador Statistics Agency
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